Practice Locally, Love Globally: Survival Guide For Liquid Times

liquid times

On staying sane in times of change. Part III (part I , part II )

When we go through transformative experiences such as an important trip, moving to another country, starting a new career path, becoming a parent, falling in/out of love, – we stop being “somebody”, the one we were before. We enter into a new dimension of ourselves which is unknown and more expansive than the previous one. This expansion is experienced in many levels at the same time (you became a parent and your house is not the same anymore, the empty room is now the room of the baby, you discover your impressive nurturing and loving capacity, and your patience, and how good is your partner in supporting – or not etc.) and comes with this new “identity” of yours.

When it comes about spiritual practice, the expansion beyond one’s known identity is also present, and one finds that deep meditation experiences are always described with the same words: “softness”, “lightness”, “indescribable peace”, “emptiness”, “centered”, “expanded” among experienced meditators. It´s like if everyone gets to the same headspace. As if profound experiences don´t differ much from one person to another. But how come that two different individuals have almost the same inner experience while going deep into meditation? One can say that, framing it in a structural perspective, the “somebody” – the one who meditates – becomes “nobody” – the one who experiences all the possibilities within without identification – and because is nobody, is everyone at the same time. 

Transformation – or change – is present at the level of our mundane life and at the level of our spiritual life too. Many spiritual doctrines teach about how one can become enlightened (a transformational process aiming at “seeing” or “knowing” things as they are) or knowing your true self (Atman), a saint (those of us “who are more perfectly transformed in the image of Christ” defines the “Lumen Gentium” No 50), how to stay closer to God or “to act according to the Light of the Creator” as Kabbalists explain, and so on. And none of these processes occur without experiencing a deep transformation within.

Whether you are moving into another country, experiencing a significant loss, falling in love, in the path of sanctity or spiritual realization, you are changing. Purists may raise a brow at this point since I´m comparing becoming a parent or traveling with the path of spiritual realization, but to me, they differ by visibility (how material or visible is the process of transformation) and calling (distinctions between what is profane and holy are, usually, the place where problems arise, and they are most of the times culturally biased – I´m not trying to say that divinity is not sacred, I´m pointing out toward a certain carefulness that is needed on this matter, especially in a globalized world). The “somebody”, the one who is aware of itself to the point of selfishness, when becomes a parent, is a “nobody”. The entire attention goes to the baby – it can´t be another way! – and all that happens around it.  The spiritual seeker, the “somebody” who seeks inner peace, wisdom or God, becomes a “nobody” in a profound meditation experience, in the Holy Communion or during the Praying time.

Our consciousness and reality are one and the same (check out my previous posts). By understanding all the aspects of our life as different dimensions of one single thing, by bringing up a core, center or unifying space within in which the “somebody” can surrender and become a “nobody”, we won´t feel lost or lacking the point of reference – a feeling that occurs very often when we experience change and transformation, especially in this “liquid modernity” as Bauman named it. On the contrary, we will embrace change, no matter how uncomfortable this change might be, because that´s the foundation of our human experience, that is what all of us (no matter our differences) experience in life. This understanding brings not only wisdom but also a greater compassion toward all living beings. And at the end of the day that counts because we are all having our own doses of fear, uncertainty, loss, gain, judgment, realization, and satisfaction, and we deserve some little peace in between.

Credits for the image @ajaychahal29

8 Conflict Resolution Tips for Respectful Conversations

Two people talking.

The world we live in today can be overwhelmingly divisive. It can become difficult to have conversations about the things that are important to you when we encounter extremism, misinformation, or even just other people’s anger. Social issues, interpersonal differences, and politics have become more and more polarized in recent times, fuelled by factors like the influence of social media and the confirmation bias of our filter bubbles. We are all bound to experience conflict, but how we handle these challenging situations makes the difference between them hurting or strengthening our relationships.

Conflict isn’t always negative. In fact, conflict can be quite constructive. It can open our minds to different viewpoints, challenge assumptions we take for granted, and help us grow as individuals. However, positive conflict depends on respect and avoiding common pitfalls.

Learning to keep a level head while also clearly communicating your ideas and opinions, even when they are being challenged, isn’t easy. If you are able to achieve a state of peace in the face of conflict, it will be a skill that will continue to serve you well in many situations.

Think about these tips, and try to incorporate them next time you find yourself in a challenging conversation:

1) Think about your body

We often say more with our bodies than we do with our words. If you’re feeling heated or upset, your body language can quickly reveal your true feelings. It’s not always possible to be aware of how we physically react to others, but try to be a little more tuned in during heated conversations.

Focus on keeping your body language neutral. It’s important to appear calm, friendly, and prepared to have an open dialogue. The person you’re speaking with will pick up on any signs of agitation or discomfort, like:

• Fidgeting
• Crossed arms
• An irritable facial expression
• Slumping over
• Looking down or away from the other person

If you start to exhibit any of these behaviors, take a deep breath and correct yourself to avoid letting your body language impact your discussion.

2) Ditch defensiveness

Successful communication begins with you. It’s very important to show the person you’re caught in conflict with that you’re secure and confident in your argument. Defensiveness sends others lots of signals, and none of them help you prove your point.

Defensiveness can come across as your feeling insecure about what you’re saying. It can make others feel like you’re unsure of yourself, or that you’re actually trying to prove a point to yourself, not them. Little supports your argument better than your own confidence in what you’re saying.

3) Stay away from low blows

On the other hand, nothing discredits you more than personal attacks. Stay away from insulting comments, eye-rolling, and dismissiveness. Not only do these behaviours incite more anger from who you’re speaking with, they show that you’re not prepared to be objective or fair during the argument. This also opens the floor for them to respond the same way, which will not result in a productive resolution.

Never attack someone’s character if you really want to get your point across. They’ll be so focused on the personal attack that they’ll stop listening to anything worthwhile you say. Instead, turn your attention to the things that they are saying about the issue at hand.

If your opponent jumps into this kind of behaviour right off the bat, ask yourself what their intentions really are. They may have started the conversation just to get a rise out of you. If this is the case, engaging with them further will just lead to frustration for you and them getting exactly what they want. In these cases, skip straight to tip number 8.

4) Be assertive

It’s hard to walk the line between assertive and aggressive sometimes, but a lot of it has to do with the way you speak and the nonverbal signals you send.

Being assertive is about making your needs a priority with confidence and directness, but without personal threats. If there’s pushback, it’s okay to share the consequences of what might happen if your needs aren’t met — if your needs aren’t met, it might be a real threat to you — but avoid any angry or intimidating comments towards others.

5) Be proactive, not reactive

It’s a great idea to learn about what the people on the other side of the argument think and feel before you get caught in a conversation unprepared. Running into the other side of the argument when you’re unable to clearly articulate a response can be frustrating, especially if what the other person is saying is offensive to you. Hearing offensive or objectionable comments may lead you to react in ways that escalate the tension.

Look into what the opposition is saying beforehand. This can help you prepare for some of the arguments you might run into while talking with others who don’t see eye to eye with you. Putting in some extra thought about how you’ll react if someone says something offensive to you during a sensitive discussion can help you avoid losing your cool. Don’t react to the things people say to try to get a rise out of you; plan for it, and counter with a calm demeanour and thoughtful argument.

6) Be vulnerable

Many people associate vulnerability with weakness — this shouldn’t be the case. In fact, it often takes a lot of strength to be vulnerable around someone who disagrees with you. It’s our gut reaction to wall up and defend ourselves. However, vulnerability can have a powerful effect on an argument.

Anger is often a defence against feelings of sadness, discomfort, or disappointment. In relationships where an unequal power dynamic exists, anger is often expressed to attempt to scare the less powerful individual into conforming to the wishes of the more powerful individual. It helps protect the more powerful person from being exposed to things that might upset them, such as the sadness a parent might feel if a child is hurt because they don’t listen to the parent.

Vulnerability allows us to shed our anger and express what we truly feel. Anger alienates others, because it works under the assumption that an unequal power balance exists, which implies that you view the subject of your anger as someone less powerful than you — whether you’re conscious of it or not. Anger means, “Because I said so.” Vulnerability means, “This is why I said so.”

7) Show empathy

Empathy is one of the most powerful ways to connect with others, even those that you don’t agree with. Showing others that you truly understand how they feel is an important part of proving to them that you can see things from their perspective. You don’t have to agree with what they say, but you have to understand where they’re coming from if you want to show them a new outlook on the issue. Practicing empathy also helps improve your overall emotional intelligence, which can lead to stronger and more productive relationships with those around you.

It can be tough to show empathy when others are hateful or irrational. In these cases, it often helps to look deeply into their argument to figure out how they came to it in the first place. Are they sad or scared? Feeling these ways can lead people to construct irrational solutions to their problems when there isn’t an easy, real solution.

8) Learn how to stop talking

There will be times when you reach an impasse, and when you can no longer have a productive conversation. Learning to recognize when you’ve reached this point before the discussion devolves into wasted energy and hurt feelings can take practice. Learning how to gracefully exit the conversation can also take time.

When it’s clear you’ve reached this point, it’s important to avoid stonewalling the other person while also successfully disengaging. If your gut is telling you to end a conversation, assess if anything is being gained from continuing the back and forth, and if not, it’s okay to simply say, “I don’t think we’ll be able to get anywhere with this conversation right now.” If you feel like there might be room to talk again later, when things have cooled off a little, it’s perfectly fine to let the other person know that. If you don’t feel like there’s any point in continuing the conversation later, that’s okay too.

Ultimately, in these cases, when there isn’t a clear resolution to the discussion, you win by not losing. You succeed by respecting yourself and the person you’re speaking with, by honestly and clearly communicating your thoughts, and by refusing to engage in behaviors that aren’t productive. If you do all of this, you’ll be able to walk away from any argument knowing you did your best and kept the peace.

Why To Study Peace?

As a Peruvian, all my life I have heard a lot of people referring to my country as “underdeveloped”, and I have always asked myself: in what way are we “underdeveloped”? I love and appreciate my country for many reasons, such as our spirituality, our strong connection with the land, our knowledge of a large variety of natural medicines, the history of Inca, the beauty of our natural landscapes… The list goes on and on. And then I also ask myself: why do we allow ourselves to be called “underdeveloped”?

Communication for Development

I grew up during the time of internal armed conflict in my country. It was during the civil war that started about two years before I was born and eventually began decreasing in intensity after 1992 when the leader of Sendero Luminoso was captured. Most parts of the country were devastated by the activity of three actors: Sendero Luminoso, Movimiento Revolucionario Tupac Amaru and the Peruvian military forces. The victims were mostly Quechua native speakers, farmers from rural areas, who were considered as the very “poor”.

When I had finished my secondary schooling and was able to comprehend this enormous tragedy suffered by my country, I decided to study Communication for Development. This is a specialisation in which you would learn how to create participatory processes of communication for the creation of well-being among people. During my years of study, I found myself becoming dissatisfied with the terminology used in the field of development such as “third world”, “underdeveloped” and “ordinary people” versus “experts”, and with the vertical approach experienced in development projects. I worked in several conventional projects that focused on benefiting the local community materially. In all of them I found that the detachment of most aid workers from the local community was incongruous with their purpose in being there.

The importance of a horizontal approach

It was not until I participated in a project where I shared my knowledge of yoga with young girls and in another one where I coached young adults in learning meditation, that I learnt the importance of a more horizontal approach. This prompted me to seek out methods to reduce the distance between the parties in development projects.

I have practised yoga and meditation for several years already. The most important influence on me has been the realisation that yoga and meditation are not only good for my health in reducing anxiety and developing physical strength, but that these practices also help me understand who I am, and to analyse and understand my identity as a Peruvian, a daughter, a sister, a girlfriend, a friend, a professional, and many other roles I have taken on in my life. They have also helped me interact with my environment more actively. The relationship I have with myself, my family, my friends, and my community have all markedly improved.

Inner peace work in practice

I found a different relationship between aid workers and the local community in those two projects which involved yoga and meditation. It was more horizontal and respectful and contributed greatly to the strength of those projects. I asked myself if inner peace work could improve the way development is implemented in the field.

This discovery and these questions motivated me years ago to study a Master in Peace, and I was amazed to see how meditation was a part of these studies. If you want to learn more about this, I recommend you to read Many Peaces by W. Dietrich and The Moral Imagination by J. Lederach.

Things to Remember When Life Gets Tough

We all have experienced difficult times in life. What’s more, we as a whole overcome them. However, some show more signs of improvements than others. What is their secret? A large portion of it needs to do with the attitude. Moreover, we need to develop good mental habits to attain peaceful minds. Here are a few things to recall when life gets tough:

1. Finding the Root Cause

Misery happens when humans oppose the way things are in reality. In case, you can change something, make a strong move and change it. In case, you cannot change things, you have two options (a) acknowledge it and let it go (b) resign yourself by fixating on it. Opting one of these options will help you accept the things you can change and the things you cannot. Whatever the dilemmas you go through, balancing life will be the appropriate option to achieve a peaceful life.

2. Creating Positive Viewpoint

The fact is – we are our own worst enemy. Happiness is truly dependent on our viewpoint. If you think something is an issue, your thoughts and feelings will be negative. But if you believe it is something you can learn from, it is not an issue any longer.

3. Start Changing Yourself

Your external world is a reflection of your inner world. Do you know people whose lives are clamorous and stressful? Isn’t it to a great extent that they feel disorganised inside? We get a kick out of the chance to imagine that changing our conditions will transform us. In fact, it’s the other way round – we have to change ourselves first before our living conditions will change for us.

3. Everything is Learning

You should simply wipe out ‘disappointment’ from your vocabulary. All extraordinary people who have ever accomplished something have ‘failed’ again and again. It was Thomas Edison who said: “I did not fail at inventing the light bulb, I just found 99 different ways that did not work”. Take back your so-called ‘failures’ and try learning something new from them rather than feeling disappointed. Figure out how to improve next time.

4. Believe that Something Better is yet to Happen

Sometimes it is hard to accept if things don’t go the way you wanted. When you glance back at your life, you will have the capacity to perceive any reason why it was really something to be thankful for rather than something that did not work out. Maybe the job you failed to get would have influenced you to invest more time away from your family, however, the job you got allowed you to be more flexible. Simply have confidence that everything happens the way it should.

5. Cherish the Present Moment

This moment will never return. There is always something valuable in each minute. So don’t let it pass by. Before long it will simply be a memory one day. Even minutes that don’t appear to be pleasant can be looked upon as something that you may miss some time in the future. As the down-home tune by Trace Adkins says, “You are going to miss this. You are going to need this back. You are going to wish nowadays hadn’t passed by so quick. You may not know this now, but rather you are going to miss this for sure…”

Everything is temporary in this wicked life. Push yourself a little more to improve your life and attain a peaceful mind.

One of the life’s most noteworthy endowments is that life is troublesome. Because in managing life’s troubles, we assemble precious quality. This quality empowers us to effectively satisfy our most profound, most significant purposes. It is decisively on the grounds that life is troublesome that we can make it extraordinary. It is on the grounds that life is troublesome that we can transcend the challenges. We can have any kind of effect and we can really matter.

People From Around The World Defining Peace

To celebrate the International Day of Peace, there was an event organized by Peace Revolution Cameroon with about 50 participants from 15 countries: Cameroon, Nigeria, Ivory Coast, Algeria, Kenya, Uganda, Zambia, Germany, Serbia, Canada, United States, and Colombia among others. The theme of this year’s event was titled as “Together for Peace, Respect, Safety and Dignity for all” by the United Nations, however, the topic of the discussion for this event was “What is your case? Let’s talk about Peace and Progress for all”. Molinge Henry, Regional Coordinator (North, Central and West Africa Region) of World Peace Initiative (WPI) was the moderator of the discussion.

The event started with the moderator welcoming participants and asking everyone to introduce themselves. He invited every participant to suggest topics for discussion that might be considered pertinent to each person; for instance, Jude from Nigeria suggested “Peace and harmonious coexistence”.

What is Peace?

Then, the moderator continued by asking for the definition of “Peace”. He defined peace as “not just the absence of conflict but as a state of mind”  meaning that irrespective of what is happening around, the state of mind determines your response to the external environment.

Jude from Nigeria defined peace as “the respect for life and fellow human being”; he further alluded that “peace cannot be achieved by force, rather it can be achieved by understanding, hence the concept of PIPO (peace in, peace out)”.

Marija from Serbia also defined peace as “being calm and patient from within with kindness”. According to Marija, kindness from within will help one avoid mistakes caused by hasty decision making. Hence, we always need to be observant and patient – it helps us tolerate other people even when one gets offended by them, you learn to spread loving kindness to everyone. When you have control over your mind, you can influence your responses to negative jabs and activities outside.

Yannick from Cameroon defined peace as “freedom from disturbance”.

Solm from Uganda defined peace as “the state of being mentally and spiritually at peace, with enough knowledge to keep one strong”.

Participant from Zambia defined peace as “stability in contention”.

The general consensus was that peace begins with every individual.

Taking a look at the current situation in south-west Cameroon, where there have been civil unrest and an almost breakdown of social services, students have not been able to go to school for about a year.  Marija from Serbia talked about the conflict that erupted in the 1990’s in Serbia when churches got burnt and religious war began. Jude from Nigeria highlighted the effect of violent extremism in north-east Nigeria, an area bordering with Nigeria, Niger, Chad and Cameroon, on how the activities of Boko-Haram have negatively affected the inhabitants living in these areas. Aminata from Ivory Coast said that peace in her country seems to be a mirage; citizens seem to be more afraid of the next presidential election circle which is around the corner.

Dialogue as a solution

In talking about solutions to fostering peace, the moderator suggested  to use dialogue as a way forward towards bringing calm and order to the current situation in Anglophone-Cameroon. Irrespective of the situation, peace must not be threatened; he further made a clarion call to all stakeholders to forge a way forward for peace.

Jude from Nigeria highlighted that military response to conflicts have never brought lasting solution; he further stressed on the need for dialogue among stakeholders. Marija also suggested dialogue as the solution being implemented towards healing process for Serbia.

The moderator talked about the essence of communication, it is very vital because messages can be misconstrued when mode of communication is not clear. Leadership entails mindfulness, especially those in a position of authority, leaders must remain positive minded in times of so much unrest, using every available means to spread the message of peace and harmonious coexistence among people. We must look out for one another, avoid using harsh and divisive words towards one another, learn to live at peace with oneself and others. The moderator went further to encourage participants to sign up on for mentoring on peace building and self development exercise.

Walk the talk

Try to see the world in a positive light in every darkness, look for gain in every pain, learn to control your mind to conceive positive things, make up your mind to be an ambassador for peace in your community. Endeavour to practice meditation daily. Love, respect, patience, tolerance, politeness are universal virtues to be cultivated in our lives to enable us live peacefully with everyone. Create more platforms for dialogue and always take the initiative towards Peace Building. Let us “walk the talk”!

Prenatal Yoga Pros: Do Now, Reap Later!

Pre-birth or prenatal yoga is one of the best things that you can accomplish for yourself, and in addition for your developing infant. It’s essential that you locate the right yoga practice for you, whether it is setting off to a yoga studio, finding a DVD, or building up your own practice at home. Listen to your body and do what feels right to you. One advantage concerning yoga is: it makes you stronger everywhere. You’ll require that additional strength in your lower body to convey the additional pregnancy weight. Also, you’ll need it in your abdominal area to handle the weight you’ll be bearing for the year or so after birth, which is carrying your child.

Doctors strongly are in the favor that all pregnant women should do yoga and listed below are a couple of reasons why it’s so strongly encouraged.

Relieves back pain
Back pain is a typical pregnancy problem, frequently aggravating as the weight of the uterus and the infant in it is on the rise. Pre-birth yoga strengthens the muscles that support this weight, taking pressure off the lower back. Numerous ladies experience inflammation of the sciatic nerve during pregnancy, and yoga can likewise be awesome for this. The pigeon stance and half-moon posture can extend this range to counter agony and inversions can make space in the pelvis to diminish inflammation. To help make pregnancy easier you can also use the aid of certain items that are designed to help you ease your back pain such as maternity belts that help share the baby’s weight or you can also try some exercises to strengthen your core.

Stress levels dip
Yoga can help reduce all that anxiety and stress that you’re constantly under when pregnant. It helps you relax and gives you space you need for yourself and for your baby. Yoga makes you relatively calm so you tend to handle chaotic situations better which is vital when you have a life growing inside of you. Plus, studies have indicated that stress affects your baby’s health and the key to delivering a healthy child is to remain calm all the time.

It’s good for your hips
Pre-birth yoga can help you with flexibility, relaxation of muscles and bone structures in the front and back of the hips. Hormones discharged throughout pregnancy often unwind joints and ligament between bones in our pelvis to set it up for labor. Be that as it may, getting the muscles prepared helps in making delivery easier. Lower Body workouts and Mindful yoga practices specifically for this part of the body would be of tremendous benefit at the time of delivery as it would strengthen the center of gravity where all activities would eventually be taking place.

Reduces constant nausea

Ask any woman what the worst part of pregnancy is and they’ll tell you that it’s the constant morning sickness and throwing up. You always feel sick and certain smells make you puke instantly that aren’t actually that bad. Yoga helps with the morning sickness, it helps you feel fresher and active and there’s a significant reduction in nausea.

Helps practice breathing
Yoga as we all know is all about breathing, taking in the atmosphere, connecting to the environment and strengthening your breathing. This is very helpful during contractions and moments just before the delivery.

Balance and feet
Our feet get us around the whole day and we barely take proper care of them. The focal point of gravity in your body moves as your pregnancy advances, this changes our position and weight in our feet and joints. The two most basic issues arise during this phase are over pronation and edema. These issues can
prompt agony at the heel, arch, or the ball of the foot. Numerous ladies might likewise encounter leg cramping and swollen veins because of weight gain.

All in all, there are innumerable benefits that could be reaped once you do it while the baby is inside and the fruits of your efforts could be reaped later!

This post is written by Brittany Whistance  who is a health and lifestyle blogger currently associated with Wish Shape.

Peace In Peace Out Europe Tour

Peace In Peace Out Europe Tour is a number of inspiring workshops and lectures in Belgium, the Netherlands, Germany and Latvia. The speaker is Venerable Teaching Monk John Paramai.

Peace In + Peace Out = Sustainable World PeacePeace In + Peace Out = Sustainable World Peace.



16/10 – Leuven – Sancta Maria High School “The meaning of life” (closed event)

16/10 – Gent – Nest “In pursuit of happiness”

17/10 – Leuven – Ricolto “Stress-management” (closed event)

17/10 – Brussels – Diving clubs Le Ceap, Le RWPC, Happy Freediver “Peace Culture”

18/10 – Brussels – Centre for European Policy Studies “Increase Productivity and Focus”

19/10 – Brussels – UNICEF


20/10 – Amsterdam – Jellinek Addiction Care Clinic “Finding peace”

21/10 – Amsterdam – FREE SPOT for event! / to be confirmed (Contact us to host the event)

21/10 – Amsterdam – Studio 191 “Finding Happiness through Inner Peace”

22/10 – Amsterdam – FREE SPOT for event! / to be confirmed (Contact us to host the event)

22/10 – Amsterdam – New Yoga School “City Enlightenment Project: Meditation and discussion”

23/10 – Nijmegen – Beleef Yoga Studio “Self-Development. Dhammakaya meditation technique”

23/10 – Nijmegen – Beleef Yoga Studio “Meditation Clinic”

23/10 – Nijmegen – De Kleine Wiel “Creativity and meditation” -

24/10 – Nijmegen – Radboud University Student Chapel “Time and Stress-Management” –

24/10 – Nijmegen – De Klinker “Non-violent resistance: case of Buddhists in Thailand”

25/10 – Nijmegen – FREE SPOT for event! / to be confirmed (Contact us to host the event)


26/10 – Kleve – CONFERENCE in Hochschule Rhein-Waal “Inner peace and sustainability”

27/10 to 29/10 – Kleve – RETREAT in Vlierhof

30/10 – Cologne – Pauenhof Meditation Centre “Mindfulness Teacher Training”

30/10 – Cologne – Allerwelts House “Benefits of meditation for stress-management”

30/10 – Bonn – Alanus University “Stress-free in university”

31/10 – Iserlohn – Naturheilpraxis Yoga Centre “Loving Kindness”

31/10 – Cologne – University of Cologne “Benefits of meditation”

31/10 – Cologne – University of Cologne “Stress-free in University”

1/11 – Cologne – Sansorio Centre “Resilience and loving kindness”


2/11 – Riga – How to Detox Your Mind? – Digital Freedom Festival

2/11 – 5/11 – Liepupe Manor – meditation retreat “Into the East: meditation holidays near the Baltic Sea”

7/11 – Riga – LU Indijas studiju un kulturas centrs(LU India study and cultural centre) – “Peace Energy”

7/11 – Riga – Laima Chocolate Museum – “daily discipline” and “how to be happy here and now”

8/11 – Riga – Latvian National Library – “The Art of Stillness”

8/11 – Riga – knowledge space “Zikurāts”- “Mindfulness practice”

9/11 – Riga – Latvian National Library – “Work-Life Balance”

9/11- Riga – BITE telecmmunications

10/11 – Riga – University of Latvia/Faculty of Humanitarian Sciences – Theravada Buddhism in Thailand: a story of Monk John Paramai

… Our acts are the consequences of our thoughts. Our thought is powerful. It can be the source of innovation, prosperity, and peace. Yet, equally likely, it can also be the source of human misery, corruption, and tragedy.

Those who can change their thoughts for the better are the ones moving forward to a better future.The right thoughts arise from clarity of the mind. Clear mind comes in the moments of stillness…

Come and get inspired at these Peace In Peace Out Tour talks. Info and registration via individual Facebook events.

Do come!

Support us by inviting your friends. Donate with remark “PIPO EU Tour” at Anna Ovchinnikova NL30 ABNA 0616 8766 61All received funds will be divided equally to provide for transportation and food costs of the tour.
Host event last-minute requests: +3164 586 6563 or PM Anna van Hulst-Ovchinnikova.

Who are we?

Volunteers at Peace Revolution project

What do we believe in?

We believe in importance and power of peace inside and out. Peace In + Peace Out = Sustainable World Peace.

More information:

Peace In Peace Out Europe Tour Facebook 

Peace Revolution Europe Facebook page

We are looking forward to sharing the peace with you.

All the best,

(in order of cities)

Philou, Tom, Gea, Bruna, Anna, Santosh, Dinah, Raul and Agnija

5 Ways to Develop Your Inner Power and Strength

Everyone in the world would desire to attain success in their life. People face a lot of problems in achieving their goals. Moreover, some of the people often get confused about what they want to do in their life. Others make a plan, but fail to execute it. All these problems can be overcome by developing inner power in you.

In this article, we will talk about your inner power which will help you in achieving the goals of your life. Hence, the inner power is referred to a state of mind which enhances your work ability. It keeps moving you ahead in the right direction in life. Precisely, the spiritual power is what makes you more confident. It makes you optimistic and positive in life. The inner power increases your focus on work instead of thinking about all the other unnecessary things in life.  You just need to follow some simple tips, and you will be on the right track of doing things.

1. Meditate daily

Meditation increases your focus; it makes you stress-free, it enhances your mental capacity. Please follow these steps to start your meditation practice:

  • Find your most comfortable posture either sitting on a chair or on the floor with your legs crossed and place your hands on the knees;
  • Start breathing and forget about everything else;
  • Count the breaths so that your focus remains entirely on the breathing;
  • You will feel quite relaxed in your mind, with freshness and clarity. All the things that were annoying you before are now gone away from your mind;
  • Repeat these steps to feel better.

If you are not able to continue your daily practice then try reading some inspirational meditation quotes.

2. Breath deeply

Sometimes you need to take a deep breath to make your thinking ability more active.  Here are some steps to follow:

  • Breathe through your nose until you feel full, you will feel that your abdominal area will fly out and chest will rise;
  • While exhaling draw your lower abdominal area followed by your upper area. Stay in that position for half a second and then continue with the exercise again.

This exercise will open up the narrow cells of your brain and increase the blood flow in your brain.

3. Laugh freely

It is quite an easy technique to increase your internal strength. Laughter also helps you to increase the energy level of your mind as it increases the endorphins in your mind. When you laugh genuinely, your heart rate and blood flow increases.

4. Learn to forget

When you feel hate or anger towards someone, there is some weight on you. Any kind of grudge for someone can be hazardous for you. It makes you weak from inside. When you feel that somebody has done something wrong to you, you start feeling sad or feel like a victim. In order to forget and let go, learn to forgive the ones who have disappointed you in the past.

5. Handle obstacles

In different phases of life, you will face different kind of obstacles. You have to believe that there is no obstacle so big to stop you. Be confident enough that you can do it and don’t make yourself indulged in any kind of controversies.  Think positive to attract positive things in your life.

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10 Uncomfortable Things You Should Do to Feel Your Inner Strength

How do you find inner strength? Do you just sit down when you’re stressed, close your eyes and find it? Unfortunately, it doesn’t work quite that easily.

Meditation is a long journey. It’s not all that comfortable as it seemed before we tried it. At first, you’ll be dealing with the monkey mind. It won’t like being still. Your body will be giving you troubles, too. As you start getting more comfortable in the position, you’ll encounter another challenge: the things you’ve hidden deep inside. They will start coming out on surface. We know we need to do this. In order to grow, we need to deal with all things we refused dealing with. Meditation makes us stronger, but it requires strength, too.

Without strength, you lack self-confidence. You don’t believe things are getting any better. You don’t believe you’re strong enough to make a change.

We’ll reach that peaceful place, eventually. If we keep putting in the effort, the results will come. The journey to that place, however, is long and bumpy. You won’t be comfortable on that road. Inner peace doesn’t come for granted. You know what? That’s the beauty of it.

When you’re ready to work for it, you should start building up on your inner strength. We’ll list 10 uncomfortable things you should do to get there.

1. Clarify the Worst-Case Scenario

You don’t like your job, but you can’t find the strength to quit? What’s the worst thing that could happen? That’s an uncomfortable vision to have, is it? Have you heard of the term affective forecasting? It’s about predicting how you’ll feel in the future. Your present feelings prevent you from imagining how bad something will feel when things go wrong.

Okay, so imagine that worst scenario that would occur if you made a step forward. Chances are, the step will still move you forward, and that’s always a better position than staying in place.

2. Accept a Challenge

The comfort zone feels oh-so-good, but it’s not a good place to stay in. Why? Because it prevents us from growing. Without growth, life doesn’t really make sense.

Do something you’re not used to. Try new tastes. Meet new people. Travel to a random place you know nothing about… You’ll become stronger just by stepping out of that comfort zone. You’ll prove to yourself that you were meant for big things.

3. Try Harder

You’re trying to accomplish something and things are not going as well as expected? In such situations, most of us are usually looking for an easy way out. What does a student do when they can’t complete a research paper? Outsourcing is a good thing when it helps you get better results, but you still have to do your part of the effort.

When you feel like you’ve tried and you’re still not strong enough, then try harder.

4. Do a Headstand

The journey to a headstand is not pleasant. You’ll have to beat the fear, which we naturally feel when someone tell us to get upside down. When you get into this position, however, you’ll realize you can do things you never thought you were capable of doing. You’re stronger than you thought.

5. Meditate Every Day

Meditate. For at least half an hour, every day. You can do it. You have time. Who doesn’t have 30 minutes for themselves? If you really don’t have that time, then it means you need meditation more than anyone. Make the time!

The seated position will be uncomfortable at first. Your mind will wander around. You won’t be able to control it. If this is your first time trying to meditate, you might start thinking: “This is not for me.” It is. Meditation is for everyone. You just need to be persistent, so you’ll allow the practice to make you stronger.

6. Remember the Times When You Were Strong

Life is an amplitude. We rise and fall, but we rise again. When we’re at the bottom, thinking of the moments when we were going strong is like a torture. It reminds us of the failure. Don’t have that attitude towards your own success. It should remind you that you’re strong. You’re still that person. You can find your strength again.

7. Just Do It

Are you overthinking things? That’s a mistake, which gets you settled in the comfort zone of doing nothing. Prove your self-confidence to yourself by taking action. Do not procrastinate. Do not overthink. Just do something to get out of the momentary situation that doesn’t make you happy.

8. Don’t Fall into Distractions

Let’s have some time off social media, shall we? Unless you absolutely need them for your work, start spending less time on these platforms. Try spending an entire week without them. You’ll realize you have time for exercise, meditation, and making plans. When you’re not distracted, you find time for things that make you stronger.

9. Stay Optimistic

This must be the hardest thing ever. The essence of being confident is believing that everything will be fine. It’s easier said than done. However, the more you keep trying, optimism becomes a habit. When you believe you deserve good things, the inner strength will come.

10. Live According to Your Values

That’s what really matters. When you’re making decisions, ask yourself: do you believe in what you’re doing? If it’s the right thing, nothing should stop you from doing it. Define your values and they will give you strength.

It’s important for all of us to keep working on our self-confidence and inner strength. It’s a never ending process, but you’ll see progress all the time. Just stay committed to your journey.



It’s the Little Things in Life: Happiness Practices Around the World

Happiness Practices Around the World

Happiness isn’t all about grand ambitions and big achievements, it’s also about the little touches that make daily life a bit nicer.

All over the world, people have found their own ways to brighten up a difficult day without the need to spend money. Our new series of illustrations takes a look at a few that you might like to try for yourself.

Japan: ‘shrinrin-yoku’

Happiness: ‘shrinrin-yoku’ Peace Revolution
Japan: ‘shrinrin-yoku’

It may sound like an ancient rite, but Japanese forest-bathing was first developed as a scientifically verified aid to conventional medicine in the 1980s. Take yourself for a mindful walk through the woods when you feel low and you can rejuvenate mind, body and soul.

Hawaii: ‘Ho‘oponopono’

Happiness: ‘Ho‘oponopono’ Peace Revolution
Hawaii: ‘Ho‘oponopono’

Hawaiians have a good awareness for the idea that anger and resentment hurt the person that feels those emotions more than the one who provoked them. Literally meaning “to make right”, the double use of the word pono – right – indicates that you must make things right with yourself as well as the other person. When you feel your anger swell, sit down with that person and talk openly about your feelings.

Norway: ‘friluftsliv’

Happiness: ‘friluftsliv’ Peace Revolution
Norway: ‘friluftsliv’

Norwegians define themselves by their connection to the natural world and outdoors living. The winter is so dark that they have to roam a little to keep their spirits up, and summer days last so long that there’s always time to visit nature. Putting some time aside each day to walk in the park or really listen to a nearby river can help you find your place in the world.

Germany: ‘gemütlichkeit’

Happiness: ‘gemütlichkeit’ Peace Revolution
Germany: ‘gemütlichkeit’

When you picture a group of Germans sitting around and laughing, that’s gemütlichkeit. Difficult to directly translate, it describes a very special kind of social bonding where being playful and lively can create a sense of belonging. You can create this feeling with your family or friends by treating each meeting as an occasion and always taking an opportunity to dance or sing together.

Spain: ‘siesta’

Happiness: ‘siesta’ Peace Revolution
Spain: ‘siesta’

The famous Spanish afternoon nap has been around for thousands of years and, if it used to be considered a physical necessity, today it is often regarded to be a luxury. Even if you don’t live in a hot climate, a 20-minute nap after lunch can help avoid that energy dip that derails so many good starts.

Argentina, Uruguay, Paraguay, Brazil: ‘mate’

Happiness: ‘mate’ Peace Revolution
Argentina, Uruguay, Paraguay, Brazil: ‘mate’

“Yerba mate raises morale,” wrote the French Society of Hygiene in 1909, “sustains the muscular system, augments strength and allows one to endure privations. In a word, it is a valiant aid.” This miraculous tree leaf tea can be taken alone as part of your morning ritual or sipped from a calabash bowl and passed around with friends.

Turkey: ‘keyif’

Happiness: ‘keyif’ Peace Revolution
Turkey: ‘keyif’

If keyif is a central part of Turkish national culture it is also, in practice, a very personal thing. Keyif means just finding a moment to be by yourself and to quietly live in the moment. You can choose to do so on the beach, on a park bench or in the bath.

Bosnia & Herzegovina: ‘kafa’

Happiness: ‘kafa’ Peace Revolution
Bosnia & Herzegovina: ‘kafa’

The tempo in Bosnia is somewhat slower than elsewhere in Europe, and kafa – the coffee break – is a big part of that. Sitting down with this specially prepared brew means committing to a discussion of world affairs and personal gossip, and forgetting about time for a few moments to concentrate on the flavor of the coffee and on the quality of your company.

Nigeria: ‘ubuntu’

Happiness: ‘ubuntu’ Peace Revolution
Nigeria: ‘ubuntu’

The word ubuntu is taken from the Zulu phrase ‘Umuntu ngumuntu ngabantu’, which is the idea that a person only exists and thrives through community. If you are open and affirming to your neighbours, you can acknowledge your part in society and strengthen yourself by strengthening others.

Next time you find yourself in need of something extra to brighten up your day, remember these nine things that make people happy around the world.


Shinrin Yoku (2017). Take a walk in the forest.
James, M. (2011). The Hawaiian Secret of Forgiveness.
Gelter, H. (1999). Friluftsliv: The Scandinavian Philosophy of Outdoor Life. Canadian Journal of Environmental Education, 5, Summer 2000
Whiteoak, J. (2007). Making ‘Gemutlichkeit’: Antecedents of ‘Bavarian-style’ Musical Entertainment.
Willis, S. (2017). Siesta.
Trigg, R. (2017). The aperitif: All you need to know about France’s ‘evening prayer’.
Smith, J. (1988). More Than a Drink : Yerba Mate: Argentina’s Cultural Rite.
McKirdy, C. (2016). How to Drink Yerba Mate in South America.
Thomas, O. (2010). Cultural encounters in Istanbul.
Sarajevo Times (2016). Drinking of Coffee in BiH: A Ritual that is much more than plain Need for a Drink.
Kimmerle, H. (2012). Ubuntu and Communalism in African Philosophy and Art.
Ifejika, N. (2006). What does ubuntu really mean?

Illustrations: NeoMam Studios